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Bison and Spring Snowfall in Gallatin Gateway, Montana

I love watching bison forage for food when the ground is covered with snow. They use their head as a shovel to push the snow away to get to the grass below. This was photographed yesterday during a late April snowfall here in Montana.

It was photographed with the Olympus OM-D E-M1X camera and M.Zuiko 300mm f4 IS Pro lens that Olympus has loaned me for a couple months. It was shot hand-held at 1/160s, f8, at ISO 200. To get the same lens reach using a full-frame camera I’d be using a 600mm f4 lens and there is no way I’d be hand holding that monster of a lens at 1/160th of a second for any amount of time!

One concern I’ve had with MFT is that the camera is only 20MP (my current Sony a7R3 has more than double the megapixels) and I specialize in large prints. The more megapixels, the larger you can print, right? If I can’t get great looking prints out of the Olympus there’d be no reason for me to switch from Sony.

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Where is the Noise in High ISO with the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Micro Four Thirds Camera?

As I continue evaluating the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Micro Four Thirds Camera that Olympus has loaned me for 2 months free of charge (and with no obligation at all to write these reviews) one aspect I will be studying is how usable high ISO images are with this camera.

I have been shooting full-frame digital since I purchased my first full-frame camera back in 2002 with the $8,000 Canon EOS-1Ds, an 11.1 megapixel camera. And simply because of the physical size difference between a full-frame sensor and a four thirds sensor, full-frame sensors by and large have less noise at higher ISO’s and thus are better in lower light situations.

But how big of a difference is the noise in higher ISO’s?

If you believe everything you read in internet forums, people are saying anything over ISO 800 is basically non-usable with four thirds cameras. This was concerning because I am often shooting ISO 800 or higher with my Sony a7R3, particularly with wildlife, and if this Olympus camera couldn’t handle higher ISO’s I would lose pretty much all interest in the Olympus system.

So I went out to a local zoo the other day to get some test shots at higher ISO’s. And this writeup is about my reflections from that day.

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Focus Stacking In-Camera with the New Olympus OM-D E-M1X Camera First Attempt

Olympus recently sent me a bunch of gear to try out free of charge for a couple months, and here is another post update on how I am liking the system.

So the new Olympus OM-D E-M1X camera has the ability to focus stack in-camera and this is one of my first shots testing out this super cool feature, and already I am in love!

I photographed this Linkley’s Silverpuff flower last week using theM.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 Pro lens. It was shot hand-held at 40mm, 1/200s, f8 at ISO 400.

For those who do not know what focus stacking is, I set the camera up to take 8 shots, allowing the camera to adjust the focus plane between each shot automatically. The camera then takes those 8 shots and blends them in-camera into one file that gives me way more depth of field than had I just taken one shot, providing me with way more detail in the flower with more of it in-focus.

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Hello Olympus OM-D E-M1X

I am pretty psyched!! Last week Olympus me some loaner equipment at no charge to test and put through the paces over the next couple months – and what a kit I received!!

The brand new Olympus OM-D E-M1X body with the following lenses: M.Zuiko 300mm f4 IS Pro with 1.4x teleconverter, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f2.8 Pro, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 Pro, and the M.Zuiko 7-14mm f2.8 Pro.

In the past week so far I have been testing this on some wildlife and landscape shots along with some HDR images and I am looking forward to seeing how it compares to my Sony a7R3 system.

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The New Luminar 3 with Libraries – the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

On December 18, 2018 Skylum will be releasing their long awaited DAM (Digital Asset Manager) for Luminar. Called Luminar 3 with Libraries, this will be a free update for everyone who currently owns Luminar 2018 on Mac and Windows.

Originally, it was first talked about being released in 2017. Once that didn’t happen it was next anticipated to be released in early 2018. That didn’t happen either, but now here it finally arrives a couple weeks shy of the end of 2018.

Has the long wait been worth it? Let us find out.

 


Quick Note Before We Get Started

I will be doing a number of free webinars showing off the new Luminar 3 with Libraries between now and December 22. I will update this blog post here once I confirm the dates and I will also be posting it on my Facebook Page as well as in my free-to-join Luminar/Aurora Facebook Group. These will be my own webinars, put on by yours truly 🙂

Join me in one of these webinars to see what is new and to ask any questions you have!!

Two New Webinars have been added, for Saturday, December 15, and Monday, December 17, 2018.

The Good

Since it’s arrival in 2017 Luminar quickly started replacing ON1 as my #1 goto program for enhancing my photographs. At the time, I was still using Capture One Pro and, to a much lesser extent, Lightroom for my RAW files. After some initial adjustments to my RAW file I would send a 16-bit Tiff file to Luminar to finish it off and give it my signature look.

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Luminar 2018 Update v1.1.0 for Windows

Skylum’s Luminar 2018 received an update for Windows today, bringing the current version to v1.1.0 (1235).

In this video I will show you all the new improvements.

Be sure to download my free Luminar presets & workspaces.

Save 10% on Luminar with coupon code mattsuess.

Learn all about Luminar 2018 by purchasing my Mastering Luminar 2018 Online Course

Here are the updates in today’s release that I discuss:

Work faster. Luminar can now launch more quickly. Plus you’ll see a faster-editing performance and better RAM usage.

Save Native files. Be sure to save your editing projects in the new native Luminar format. This makes it easy to come back and edit later. Plus files can be shared between Mac and Windows users.

Clone & Stamp released. Remove objects and blemishes with ease!
LUT Mapping. Any LUT you’ve chosen can now be stored to a preset with no need to link to the original .cube file.

More export control. You can choose to export to the Adobe RGB wide color profile or the ProPhoto space on export. You can also sharpen an exported file which is great for printing.

Better masking controls. Users can adjust both the feather and density controls on a mask to refine the blending of layers. When editing a mask, a user can also press the X hotkey to toggle between Paint/Erase brush mode.

More editing control. Now even more raw formats can be edited natively with our RAW Develop filter. All filters also support advanced blending mode options as well.

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